gjmueller:

Pre-Hire Peek at Social Networks, Facebook May Backfire

The growth of social networks has spawned a new business practice whereby prospective employers often review an individual’s Facebook page, or other personal social media content, as a pre-screen for the hiring process. 
William Stoughton, a doctoral student at North Carolina State University, believes the organizations may be committing a breach of privacy or, at the very least, creating a negative impression of the company for potential employees.

image via flickr:CC | English106

gjmueller:

Pre-Hire Peek at Social Networks, Facebook May Backfire

The growth of social networks has spawned a new business practice whereby prospective employers often review an individual’s Facebook page, or other personal social media content, as a pre-screen for the hiring process.

William Stoughton, a doctoral student at North Carolina State University, believes the organizations may be committing a breach of privacy or, at the very least, creating a negative impression of the company for potential employees.

image via flickr:CC | English106

priceofliberty:

A couple of months ago, a friend of mine asked on Facebook:

Do you think that facebook tracks the stuff that people type and then erase before hitting <enter>? (or the “post” button)

Good question.

We spend a lot of time thinking about what to post on Facebook. Should you argue that political point your high school friend made? Do your friends really want to see yet another photo of your cat (or baby)? Most of us have, at one time or another, started writing something and then, probably wisely, changed our minds.

Unfortunately, the code in your browser that powers Facebook still knows what you typed—even if you decide not to publish it.* It turns out that the things you explicitly choose not to share aren’t entirely private.

Facebook calls these unposted thoughts “self-censorship,” and insights into how it collects these nonposts can be found in a recent paper written by two Facebookers. Sauvik Das, a Ph.D. student at Carnegie Mellon and summer software engineer intern at Facebook, and Adam Kramer, a Facebook data scientist, have put online an article presenting their study of the self-censorship behavior collected from 5 million English-speaking Facebook users. (The paper was also published at the International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media.*) It reveals a lot about how Facebook monitors our unshared thoughts and what it thinks about them.

I would read the whole article, but it’s kind of silly. Facebook calls it “self-censorship,” which, if you ask me, seems like a very loaded phrase for the concept they’re trying to coin.
I mean for all Facebook knows, I’ve simply left something unposted only to repost it in a better manner.